Daily Telegraph article

Daily Telegraph article

Daily Telegraph article Very dissapointed in the Telegraph - not using men who had actually had Breast Cancer.

David W

I agree, but… … it did highlight the fact that men get Breast Cancer with the sad story of his brother dying and also the gentic links.

What I found interesting about it was the 25% increase in male cases over the past 20 years. What does that tell us - that men are more aware or that the medical profession are more inclinded to diagnose Breast Cancer in Men. Or is it just beacause of the proportionate rise in population? Aren’t statistics a wonderfully confusing waste of time sometimes.

Brian

Here is the link If anyone wants to read the article…

telegraph.co.uk/health/main.jhtml?xml=/health/2006/03/20/hbreast20.xml

Regards

BrianP

telegraph yes David I feel the same …and Jeremy Vine on radio 2 yesterday did a how to spot the early signs and didnt even mention men and breast cancer I emailed the show and got a thankyou for my email but we didnt even get a mention… so have written again today.

We will make men aware !!!

Being aware I think men and women need to look out for each other. My husband found the lump that led to me being diagnosed with breast cancer (the lump wasn’t cancer, the cancer was in the other breast - long story).

Since I was diagnosed, we check each other regularly for anything unusual (visions of monkeys grooming each other) and recently I found he had a small lump which my consultant checked. Fortunately it’s nothing sinister.

I was probably supervigilant after some of us had the interesting debate on here about support groups. My son now knows that men can get breast cancer too. He told me he didn’t realise men had milk ducts as well as women or that men can have mammograms.

I had to go to my breast clinic recently and a man saw the surgeon before me. There were just a few of us waiting so I don’t know whether his appointment had been deliberately scheduled for a quiet time. He was only in his thirties or could have been younger. He was discharged from the clinic, which was clearly a great relief to him as he shot out of the door like a rabbit, so it looks as though there is some evidence of increased awareness in men.

Perhaps it’s something that could be covered in schools - teenagers are told about health issues and I think that includes testicular cancer for boys. Perhaps that could be extended so that they are made aware that breast cancer can also affect men.