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Feeling apprehensive

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Member

Re: Feeling apprehensive

Thanks for the advice. I’m just finding it difficult to accept that there are so many different and unpredictable responses to treatment. Oh well, it will be my turn soon then I’ll know!

Member

Re: Feeling apprehensive

Hi

 

This was me last year. 1st chemo on Christmas Eve and totally terrified. The hospital did such a lot to allay my fears because I was open with them from the start (ie. I’m a panicker but I’m not ashamed of it!). You’ll have been given some indications of potential side effects but the fact is, every one of us reacts differently. I have a friend currently at the end of her first cycle of chemo and she’s driving around Iike nothing’s happening whereas I was flat out in zombie world for most of week 2 and barely recovering during week 3. 

 

My advice would be to keep on with that great attitude - it’s got to be done. The hospital will do everything it can to mitigate the predictable side effects and will continue to adapt/help as you report back to them. Keeping a symptoms diary and a medication checklist is very helpful throughout. Prepare for the worst-case scenarios (I mean things like not being able to drive, days when you can’t get out of bed) and you’ll be pleasantly surprised, probably. Some things will get to you regardless - mostly constipation, chemo-brain and loss of taste, from talking to others).

 

One thing is essential. Make sure you have an accurate thermometer (and a back-up isn’t a bad idea). I bought a new one which turned out to be faulty - I ended up with 4 days of drips and blood transfusions as a result of trusting my thermometer! Keeping an eye on your temperature is not just them making a fuss - it’s a very real risk so worth doing properly. Apart from that, it’s wait and see I’m afraid - but I never even felt sick and never saw anyone sick. They give you meds for all that. 

 

I wish you all the best. It’s cumulative so it may get harder but you focus on the number of treatments left and how close you are getting to the last one. It’s not over even then but at least there’s no more ‘infusions’ and you know things will start to improve again.

 

Take good care of yourself,

Jan x

Member

Feeling apprehensive

Hi, I’m a 65 year old with triple negative grade 3 found on a routine mammogram ( thank goodness for screening).  Had lump removed and starting Docetaxel and Carboplatin on 22nd November. Rather apprehensive although I know it’s got to be done. My problem is I like to know what’s going to happen, call me a control freak. It’s not the actual procedure and giving of the drugs but how I’m going to react afterwards. Suppose I should prepare for the worst then anything other than that is a bonus!