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Struggling to re-frame my thinking about my Mum's diagnosis - I could do with some advice

3 REPLIES 3
Member

Re: Struggling to re-frame my thinking about my Mum's diagnosis - I could do with some advice

I havebeen told mine is treatable not curable and that is how I deal with it. Many people living much longer with secondaries scan showed 4 of my 6 tumours gave shrunk on letrozole and ibrance met someone else who has also had good results. Hope you get good help and support.

Member

Re: Struggling to re-frame my thinking about my Mum's diagnosis - I could do with some advice

Liza

Thanks for the response. Letrosole is what she's being prescribed and I'm going ask about Ibrance as I've heard good things. I hope you continue to have success with this. It's good to hear.

Julie

Member

Re: Struggling to re-frame my thinking about my Mum's diagnosis - I could do with some advice

I have secondaries in lung and bone been on letrozole and ibrance and initially was to have surgery but tumour in breast has shrunk with treatment, I had surgery to breast and lymph nodes in 2009 and was disease free til 2018 when secondaries happened. Hope your mum gets on ok with oncologist . Liz

Member

Struggling to re-frame my thinking about my Mum's diagnosis - I could do with some advice

Good morning ladies (and gents)

 

My mum has recently been diagnosed with grade 2 invasive lobular breast cancer in one breast. We thought OK, she's going to have a mastectomy and then be on Letrosole for the rest of her life. Then yesterday, boom! The CT scans shown 3 spots on her lungs around 7mm. So I guess we've gone straight to stage 4 without passing go.

 

The doctor has now referred us to an oncologist and says that he thinks that doing surgery isn't the right thing. Rather he'd like to probably see her go straight onto Letrosole to shrink the tumour and hopefully stop this bloody thing in it's tracks. She's 82.

 

She's happy that she doesn't have to have an operation as is my Dad (79). I know I'm lucky to have them both but I'm really struggling here to reframe my thinking about her managing this condition. I've done so much reading that I'm all over the place with statistics and prognosis.

 

Do you have any advice for me, as the daughter of somebody with metastatic breast cancer about how I can reframe my thinking about her managing this long term as a chronic condition instead of just sitting here thinking crap it's all gone wrong?

Thanks for reading

Julie