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Alcohol and Breast Cancer

Guest user
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Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

Kelly

Was interested in your comment about fathers & daughters as I never know there was a link. My dad has prostate cancer & I now have BC but whenever I have been asked about cancer in the family & mentioned my dad the doctors seems to just dismiss it - they're looking for any other BC in the family.

Would be interested if you have any links to literature about this connection.

I used to drink quite a bit in my youth & am a red wine lover now. I like your GPs advice 2 glasses 3 times a week, going to the offy now, clink clink!

LOL

Alison
x

princess18
Member

Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

Hi all,

just to add my ten pence worth! My oncologist said exactly the same as Alise's, so I'm sticking with that until I hear anything convicing otherwise. I am quite a big drinker, always have been. However, I know many women who have never drunk much alcohol, exercised regularly and ate a mega healthy diet yet still developed bc!! So, I'm taking this piece of evidence with a pinch of salt. Next week they'll be telling us how drinking alcohol reduces the risk of bc!!!

If we listened to everything these so called 'researchers' tell us we'd never eat or drink anything!!

So, balls to it, I'm gonna continue to eat, drink and be merry!!! A little bit of what you fancy is my philosophy,

Take care,

Kelly
-x-

Guest user
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Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

I aske d my onc about alcohol and he said there is NO firm evidence to link it to breast cancer whatsoever. He said the studies are flawed becuase people who drink often smoke and have a poor diet and this was not factored in. SO ENJOY! He is a top consultant and I am sure if there was a link he would tell me.

Love Alise

ForumMember
Member

Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

This has really got me thinking: what about Linda McCartney, I believe she never drunk alcohol, was a vegetarian, exercised, obviously had no money worries or issues, yet she got BC. My Dad was not a drinker either, started with prostate, spread to stomach and lungs. There is also a definite link between fathers with prostate cancer and daughters with breast cancer, even more strange with these two factors blood group is nearly always A+, just like me and my Dad. I am E+ by the way.

My GP did tell me a few weeks ago, only drink 3 times a week, 2 glasses each time. Trying to take his advice but at the moment with the stress a bit hard.

My heart goes out to you all who have lost loved ones. This is the first time I have lost someone so close to me, hurts like hell!!

Guest user
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Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

Hi, Kelly. I'm also sad for you to lose your Dad and to cancer. It is possible to have a good time and look after yourself too and I'm sure that's what he would want for you.RoadRunner - how sad and difficult to cope with your Mum's death and your own diagnosis in just 3 weeks. I'm sure that family habits and lifestyles can lead to the whole tribe getting the same family of illness. Perhaps this is a good time for you to look at this with your brother. There are definitely factors in common with breast/colon/prostate cancers which may apply to you. The friends I have lost to brain tumours have had brain or breast or lung or colon primaries but I don't know that history helps. It's just a matter of doing the best you can with what you've got-

Dru I'm not sure which newspaper report you saw. It's been known for ages that women after recurrence and after menopause or over 50 are at higher risk if they drink. I wonder what else has just been published...

Wishing you well,

Jenny

RoadRunner
Member

Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

Hi Kelly,

Sorry to hear about your dad. I lost my mum to cancer three weeks before I was diagnosed. My dad too, but several years ago. I think my brother is getting worried as it really seems to be in the family (tho' my dad was bowel cancer and with my mum they couldn't find a primary - she was diagnosed with brain mets - but they didn't think it was breast cancer)

RR
xx

Guest user
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Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

Please don't feel guilty or beat yourselves up - it doesn't help and probably depresses your immune system until you get over it. Obviously it can be useful to learn some lessons from our past lifestyles and behaviours which contributes to how we got to here.

However, what's important is what you do from now.

I found giving up the odd glass or 2 of wine or beer (and I really was only an occassional and light drinker) was more difficult than becoming vegan! But that period of adjustment passed and was just a part of the acceptance that if I was going to do the best I could for myself, there had to be some radical changes, some harder than others. And let's face it, most of us have drunk enough already to last a lifetime if we follow the 1 unit of alcohol a day rule for women - we just got in a few of those rounds early in life so no need to feel deprived. It's amazing how good life feels without it and that you can chill out and enjoy company alcohol free. It just takes a little practice.

Wishing you well,

Jenny

RoadRunner
Member

Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

If you read a book called 'Foods to Fight Cancer' in there it says red wine is good for you. The scientist who wrote the book says that surveys never distinguish between different types of alcohol, and therefore the assumption is that other types of alcohol are bad, but red wine is good (my onc told me this too). Something to do with the chemicals present in red grapes. So if you don't like alcohol drink red grape juice.

As for me - I always preferred white wine, but I'm trying to develop a taste for red!

ForumMember
Member

Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

Hi girls

Goodness, I have been down this road and gone round the roundabout a dozen of times. Mentioned before in another post ages ago, I have always watched my weight, eaten healthily, only known my hubby in the "naughty" sense, never taken drugs, yes, enjoy my wine and champers, never smoked, never took the birth pill, etc etc. Had a scare 20 years ago but was nothing, Consultant said then I am very low risk but still ended up getting it. My Onc I have now has said that you can get someone who has done everything above to excess and will never get cancer - there's no rhyme or reason for it.

What I can say now, if I fancy a cream cake once a week, a glass or two of wine with my dinner then so be it. If I was a "good" girl before then I shall certainly enjoy being a "naughty" girl now. My Onc said if they knew why some people got BC and some people didn't, it would be a lot easier to find a cure for this horrible disease. Live life to the full while you can. I have just lost my Dad last weekend to cancer and it was just horrendous, he told me to enjoy my life while I have got it, lets face it nobody knows what is around the corner, we could all be sitting here worrying about BC returning (I know I do, its with me every day) but we could get knocked down by a bus tomorrow.

Have and do what you fancy, everything in moderation, we all have to go through so much with treatment and then medication I think we all deserve a little light relief now and then.

Love K

Guest user
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Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

I have never drunk any alcohol(just dont like it) ..... I still got BC and how I wish I did drink, a nice glass of wine would make the medicine go down.... please dont feel guilty you have to think of quality of life obviously no 'binge' drinking is a good idea but that is the same for everyone.

lizalou
Member

Re: Alcohol and Breast Cancer

Oh it's depressing. Things like this make me feel guilty as I have enjoyed a tipple or two and 6 months before being diagnosed was drinking too much as having a rough time of it one way or another. I suppose we'll never know how much we contributed to our own bc and how much of it has just been pants luck all round.

I have cut down massively - hardly drunk anything at all since being diagnosed and only a couple of glasses of wine on chemo over last 6 months. I have no idea if it increases risk of recurrance. I guess not drinking can't hurt, but like you said we've been through such a lot of crap we deserve a drink every now and again!!

I think you can defo have a glass of wine or champers to celebrate and every now and then when we feel like it. I'm not drinking every day so a blow out every few months with the odd glass here and there shouldn't be a total disaster. I've been stressing a lot over what to eat, drink to try and make sure this never comes back and I don't have to go through this again... but when it comes down to it we have the disease in our bodies now, it'll do what it does. We've had/are getting the best treatment we can. Being healthy is a good plan but I will try, and you must try, not to beat yourself up over it and make self miserable. Health and happiness...few glasses of wine too!!
xx

DruChurch
Member

Alcohol and Breast Cancer

In the light of today's newspaper reports, are people considering giving up alcohol altogether or do you think it's a bit like closing the stable door after the horse has bolted!! or does it make a difference to the chances of the cancer recurring? I would hate never to be able to have a glass of wine with dinner again or champagne to celebrate but I feel incredibly guilty about the whole thing. Did I bring breast cancer upon myself by drinking too much in my youth (and thereafter!) Anybody got any comments?