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Healthy diet

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Re: Healthy diet

I'm so with everyone and the wind problem! I think it does get marginally better over time and your stomach adjusts but some pulses are terrible. With regard to the veg I wonder if its because the fibre isn't there after juicing?

Bahons - thanks for info on bread maker. definitely going to look into that.

Elinda x

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Re: Healthy diet

Made me laugh - sorry! I was very worried about this issue when I started my healthy diet, previously a bowl of vegetable soup would cause some trouble, and as for lentils, well that would mean taking a week off work! (otherwise they'd have sent me home or fired me 😉

To my surprise though, raw veggies (whole or juiced) seem to cause no problem whatsoever. Maybe it's cooking them that makes it harder to digest?

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi Truffle Shuffle,

Unfortunately with a plant heavy diet the wind tunnel continues after chemo, or at least in my experience it has.

My family reckon it could be harnessed to provide an ecofriendly fuel for the house!

Gotta keep a sense of humour....

Snoogle
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Re: Healthy diet

Since recon op in may , I have done nothing but follow a healthy diet, well for most of the time, I have eaten soooooo much fruit, veg and everything else deemed to be good for you.

well my house now has a permenant blue haze engulfing it, I cannot move without breaking wind, much to everyone amusement.My carbon footprint must have trebled, and im sure can see the hole in the ozone layer,just above my house!!!!

I just keep blaming the chemo

take care allxx

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Re: Healthy diet

Yes, it is a good thread, Val - and a theme which often crops up on here, too.

I'm like you, everything in moderation and plenty of variety. I must admit, tho' I've eased up on sweet stuff a bit, but more from a dread of becoming diabetic than a bc standpoint.

X to all

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Re: Healthy diet

My take on all this? A little of what you fancy does you GOOD. I have never been on a diet. My Dad always used to grow his own veg organically. Never smoked. Didn't drink. Never took drugs. Breast fed two children. Didn't even drink tea or coffe then as I preferrd water. However I got BC when 39. I will eat anything now. Whatever takes my fancy. My body usually tells me when I need rhubarb or kiwi fruits or spring greens. I have a bread maker. I don't like the bread it produces at all and dislike the hole it leaves in the bottom of the loaf from the paddle!... But I love Nigel Slater and his book "Appetite" has the simplest and best bread recipe ever. Four ingredients only. Flour yeast salt water. Have experimented with the hand method of bread making and even taught another lady who was keen to learn how to do it. I don't make bread every day and still buy ordinary bread. Scones,cheese, fruit or bran ones are all so easy to do and make a pleasant change. But I never worry about what I eat. I love home made curry but love a tiny cafe in town with its various curries and fab garlic Naan bread. My main hangup is when I do not feeling hungry but knowing I have to eat something before I have my chemo tablets or they will not work....then I rely on breakfast cereal or banana on toast. Something simple. But love the thread anyway. Love Val XX

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Re: Healthy diet

Indian food should be great, all those veggies and turmeric in the pilau rice! You've made me crave a takeaway tonight 🙂

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Re: Healthy diet

Re Indian and no butter/ghee.

My local indian is fantastic, they cook my meals without dairy and they are lovely, especially the fish bhuna or garlic fish. Healthy and gorgeous with fresh vegetables and plain rice, mmm.

Katie

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi all

I have to say that I've a slightly different take on the whole diet thing.

First of all, I feel that there's no doubt that eating well is good for you, for all sorts of reasons.

On the other hand, I also tend to the view that a bad diet will increase your risk of developing certain illnesses, cancer among them, rather a good diet reducing it, if you follow me.

But as for examining everything I eat to discern the cause of why I got bc then no. A big no. The bc puzzle isn't as simple as that as far as I can see. I'm getting the impression that's it's a complex interaction of genetics, environment, lifestyle factors (including, but not limited to, diet).

I have the misfortune to have had my children late at 26(!) (according to the surgeon), altho' not particularly so by the standards of modern times. There is a history of various cancers, including ovarian in my family. I was exposed to a lot of noxious chemicals in my late teens and twenties. I did a lot of night shift work and a fair bit of flying, too. All these factors have also been cited in recent years as increasing risk for bc and there is absolutely nothing I can do about them at this stage. So I refuse to beat myself up about what dreadful things I might eaten in the past -it's just one element, one part of the jigsaw. I eat more healthily now than I've ever done, but I don't obsess about it. Eating is meant to be a pleasure, so it's lots of the stuff that's supposed to be good for us, plus plenty of treats as well for me! 🙂

X to all

S

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi, I read the David Schrieber book too. Found it quite thought provoking. It was recommended to me by a friend I have made at yoga class at our local cancer charity centre. I also get my fruit delivered weekly by abel and cole.

I find it terrible that we feel forced to examine everythign we've eaten in the past in case that was the cause of us getting this awful disease. This particularly annoys me as most of the foods I avoid now are ones that the nation has been encouraged to eat by various governments and health promotions!

My take on the situation is that my oncologist controls the drugs that I have and I control the food that I have.

Tried a bread maker in the past and really didn't get on with it. Have children eager to knead the dough for me so won't worry about trying another model for a while!

As a little add in, I have been avoiding Indian takeaways because I am aware of the cream/butter used in making the sauces. I rang our local takeaway the other evening as we where having friends round and getting dinner delivered. They said that if I told them what dish I wanted and if it was feasible for them to do so they would make it dairy free! I was quite impressed. However, our friends chose Chinese so I don't know if it would actually have worked out.

Snoogle
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Re: Healthy diet

Hi Elinda

With a bread maker, you load all the ingredients into it, set the programme and away you go.

The features vary with the brand, but there are usually settings for quick loaves (usually made with the bread mixes you can buy in supermarkets and other shops), delayed action (so you can wake up to the smell of freshly made bread), choice of size of loaf, etc etc.

There is usually a recipe book provided with the machine and you can also buy recipe books specifically for breadmakers.

I'm on my fourth breadmaker (I wear them out!) since 1998. MY current model is a Panasonic SD 253 and it's far and away the best I've ever had. I bought it through Amazon, who were 25% cheaper than high street retailers - and Lakeland, I'm afraid. The pan is coated and every loaf just slides out after cooking - bread sticking to the pan can be a problem with breadmakers. There are lots of programmes, too, including one for specially blended gluten free bread mixes. It will even make cakes, marmalade and jam.

One the subject of gluten free and breadmakers, I don't make gluten free bread myself, but some names to look out for for bread mixes are Juvela, Trufree, Schar and Glutafin.

X to all

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi everyone

This thread is really informative. It's great to hear from like-minded ladies who are doing what I've been doing for the last 18 months or so.

I try to buy organic where possible at my local supermarket and like Gardenbeetle also buy Able & Cole veg boxes sometimes. I've read David Servan Schreiber's book a couple of times and think it's really good. Jason Vale's juice book was the one that got me started. Now I tend to throw lots of things together and enjoy experimenting.

I get dreadful heartburn after eating some breads but I can't fathom out what is causing it because some other breads don't bother me. Same with pastry. Is it yeast or gluten or something else causing this? I've been thinking about buying a breadmaker for ages. Does anyone use a breadmaker that doesn't require either/or to make bread or is this not possible?

Love
Jibby X

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Re: Healthy diet

Catflap - thanks for reassurance re green tea. I have been anxious about that.

Bahons - excuse my ignorance but what does the breadmaker actually do? Does it save time and/or effort? Would be interested as I've only made bread without any equipment but would like to do this more regularly.

Elinda x

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi again

I think it is almost impossible, even in France where I now live, to get much, if anything, in the way of unpasteurised cheeses.

BTW, I'm currently having chemotherapy and my French oncologists/chemo nurses have said nothing about food whatsoever, so I've continued to eat exactly what I want. In fact, pate appears on the lunchtime menu in the chemo unit.....!

Yes, I would thoroughly recommend a bread maker - I've got a Panasonic, myself.

X to all

S

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Re: Healthy diet

thanks for that, my friend has brought me a selection of cheeses as i love them, it says on most of them made from pastuerised milk, the brie included, (M & S) so i guess they are ok

thankyou

anna

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi Anna

I was told to avoid anything unpasturized (brie, pate etc) and no runny eggs, seafood or anything that could give you an upset stomach/injection. I love brie and it will be one of the first things I eat when all this is over!!!! Ask the ONC or chemo nurses tomorrow to steer you in the right direction - every unit is different!

Take care
xxx

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi i have another silly question, is brie unpastuerised?? and do we have to avoid them types of cheese on chemo??

thanks

anna

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Re: Healthy diet

Yes Bahons, I am considering getting one. Every time my OH does anything in the kitchen it looks like a disaster zone. However, I cannot fault his Iranian basmati rice (taught to him by an Iranian friend and it's a secret lol) or his roast potatoes - both far better than I can make.

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Re: Healthy diet

Excuses for butting in, but going back to Cherub's comment about the bread - have you thought of getting a bread machine, cherub?

Lovely homemade bread with less mess and fuss!

X to all

S

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Re: Healthy diet

For some brilliant information and advise I advise "Anti-cancer - A new way of life" by David Servan Schreiber. It is really readable and gives lots of info about research and cancer fighting foods as well as a section on the mind/body connection.
I can't do extremes so am just doing what I can which is taking a bunch of supplements and adding as many of the good foods as I can to my diet.
alex
xx

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi, sorry to butt in on your thread, but I wanted to reassure Elinda as my Onc told me that Green Tea was one of things meant to help beat cancer, I struggle to drink it so I now take a supplement (am now 2 yrs past dx). But I did take supplements all thro treatment, I got them in the first week (the panic week where you think that everything you eat has caused it!) from the Penny Brohn Cancer site, they do a supplement pack that has high dose Vit C, multivitamins, omega fish oils and Antioxidant supplements. I took these all thro treatment apart from about 4 or 5 days after chemo (which is what they suggest). I know that it didn't interfere with my chemo as I had chemo first and my lump reduced to just a few cells by the time I had my op.

I still beat myself up sometimes tho about what I eat now (especially if I have a bit too much wine!) but I do think it takes a while to find your comfort zone.

Good Luck

Mx
ps I did ask my Onc about supplements first and he just said that normal multivitamin types are fine

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Re: Healthy diet

ha ha just read it on the site i meant organic brocolli. I stood on my lap top so i cant see what I am writing so if things don't make sense that's whay. Shame I can't use that excuse in the real world he he.

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi All

For brocolli jucicing its just the same as jucing anything else, not a smoothy make though you can get ones that do both juicing and smoothies. If you can get organic if possible its much better.

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Re: Healthy diet

Hello Ladies, I love this thread and reading everything you all do. We appear to be really lucky at my hospital with help and advice. On day 1 of Chemo the dietician came to se me, I was given various what to eat and not to eat leaflets and had an informative chat and 4 days after they called me to review how my eating was going and to talk about what would help with the SE and recovery. I eat as healthily as possible, whith occasional lapses that I plan! My blood count has gone very low but I believe my healthy diet has helped me. I was told to avoid crowds, children with colds etc but that's difficult as I have a 6 year old who has come home from school with that many coughs and colds this term, so far I've had nothing - not even a sniffle! Mind you I have that much garlic I probably have a protective haze around me! LOL. When not on chemo I drink red grapefruit juice and I miss that more than anything else, when I finish that's what I'll celebrate with...

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi Cherub

You and your husband sound very much like me and mine. We grew a lot of our veg this year - tomatoes, beans, courgettes, salad and also blueberries. We've got cabbages underway and are going to have apples trees in pots on our patio.
I too make my own cakes and biscuits occasionally using oil and sweetening with soaked chopped dates or a little agave syrup.
Once I've finished radiotherapy I've decided to start making my own bread. As you say it's about knowing what's in things but also tastes so much better fresh. Once you get into it its' not the hard work you think its going to be and growing your own stuff is quite exciting.

Elinda x

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Re: Healthy diet

Most of the veg and salad I eat is from OH's garden, we also have a huge amount of rhubarb out there every year. I don't really eat an awful lot of meat as we largely gave up on red meat back in the mid 80's when it was linked to high cholesterol. I like to make all my own soups (at the moment I've got 6 different kinds in the freezer and had a watercress and courgette one today with a slice of walnut bread which was lovely).We probably eat vegetarian meals 2 or 3 times a week. I also make little cakes using olive oil instead of butter and I add different things to them like grated apple, dried fruit etc. I figure if I make my own cakes and biscuits I know what is in them, no preservatives like the supermarket ones. I picked loads of blackberries down near the seafront again today, so will either freeze them for winter or make jam from them. We do find now that if we get a takeaway from time to time, we don't really feel that great the following day, a bit bloated and horrible.

OH is talking about wanting to make bread, so I guess I'm going to have a kitchen like a bomb has dropped on it, you know what blokes are like lol!

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Re: Healthy diet

Snoogle I totally agree that doing something proactive is helpful psychologically. It's helped me to feel more in control.

Perhaps its psychological but common sense would dictate that it is more than that too as we are doing everything to enhance our immune system. If we know 'bad' food can damage our bodies then 'good' food should surely help.

I am very worried about the green tea thing though. It's all I've been drinking through chemo and no literature I've said says don't drink it. It's not a supplement so it hasn't occurred to me to ask the Oncologist.

elinda x

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Re: Healthy diet

We all seem to be given conflicting advice. Personally I was completely dairy free from moment of diagnosis of secondaries. Also gave up red meat and alcohol, although I have had the odd tipple since chemo finished. I try to eat only organic fruit, veg, poultry and fish, although this is not always possible. I take a variety of supplements. I also drink loads of green tea and other herbal/fruit teas. I juice once a day and mix this with flaxseed, manuka honey and a blend of herbs and spices (a combination worked out from finding out which herbs and spices are supposed to have cancer fighting agents, are good for the digestion and other criteria). I don't know if this is helping, but at the end of the day if I am doing something positive to help myself even if its only that that is helping then its worthwhile.

Snoogle
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Re: Healthy diet

Hi Annalou

Have a look at Jason's Vales juice doctor book - lots of fab recipes for veg juice. As mentioned my favourite is beetroot, carrot and orange (and this is the girl who can't stand carrots!).

Goji berries are also good and high in anti-oxidants - dried on porridge with raisins and seeds - yum, yum!
x

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi

Conflicting advice - I drink lots of green tea with lemon as its high in anti-oxidants and I juice lots of veg and drink the juice (especially raw beetroot and carrots). So far bloods have been good, so must be doing something right. My ONC is not a fan of supplements, apart from mulibonita which is a probiotic which he says is fine to take whilst having chemo (500 time stronger than an pro-biotic yogurt) and helps balance out the bad bacteria in the gut. Certainly kept my iBS at bay. He has written a book, that you can buy off his website, which I have found invaluable. As with anything in there, always check with your ONC first before starting anything new. Link to website is canernet.co.uk. All the info in the book is availble on line, so don't necessarily need to purchase.

x

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Re: Healthy diet

I am only having rads but the onc said healthy diet and green tea is OK while having those. Planning to look more into supplements when treatment finished, have also heard good stuff about wheatgrass.

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Re: Healthy diet

Thanks for the replies, i guess i will leave it till the chemo finishes in december,

thankyou

anna

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi
Yes I was told to stay off green tea whilst on chemo, must be powerful stuff!....the green tea aswell as the chemo!
Smiler
x

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi

Sorry for butting in.

I understand that a number of products, including green tea, are often not advised during chemotherapy as they can interfere with the action of the drugs. I think the same applies to vitamin pills.

You might need to check this out with your onc. I was always told to eat healthily, but lay off the so-called 'superfoods' during treatment.

X

S

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi,

i have another silly question (im good at these)

when i first started chemo, i asked the nurse if i could take anything extra to boost my immune system etc. She said not to take anything as it hasnt been proven not to interact with the chemo drugs. My question is, is it safe to take things such as green tea whilst having chemo??
I have just bought some sencha green tea, im sure thats its ok just wanted to check.

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi this is posted on behalf of a user, June, moderator

I advocate the wheat grass juice. Has all the minerals and vitamins. Need to have it on an empty stomach. Made a big difference with my skin and energy.

No side effects and helps the immune system. More details read about it on by Ann Wigmore. Best to grow it.

My diet consists mainly vegetables and fruits. Wish you all well

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Re: Healthy diet

My BCN did offer diet advice, but only when pushed! And my onc. rather cryptically told me to 'rediscover my kitchen' - how did she know that I never cook I wonder!?

But I do really wish the conventional and complementary sides would speak to each other a bit more.

Annalou24, I agree re the psychological benefit. Look how effective placebos can be... positive state of mind is probably as medicinal as the food - which makes it doubly good 🙂

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi all

Here's the link to the BCC booklet on 'diet and breast cancer' which you might find interesting:-

http://www.breastcancercare.org.uk/upload/pdf/bcc_diet_09.pdf

Kind regards
Sam (BCC Facilitator)

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi, yes i have found they have said eat healthy, but no cancer busting food advice. In fact i was even encouraged to eat diary, but then as my tumour is negative to hormones maybe thats why??

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Re: Healthy diet

Hiya

The conventional medical professionals seem very reluctant to talk about diet at all. Maybe they're not allowed to ? I asked my BCN about diet when I was first diagnosed and all she said was " well some people think there's a link to diary products and try to aviod them..." and she seemed not to want to pursue the conversation at all.

I feel much better after eating healthily for a week( for the most part...I did have a small portion of chips on Wednesday!); calmer but with more energy on the whole. I think the psychological benefit of actually doing something positive is probably helping me as much as the food itself !

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi Anna, I will take a look in sainsbury's. I got foods to fight cancer, the science is so interesting. It does make me wonder why certain foods arent promoted by the hospital. Its also nice to think we are doing something positive to fight this thing.

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi all
I got some Sencha green tea in Sainsburys and it wasn't that dear...
Have just used the juicer for the first time, broccoli and apple. It was really nice but only got a tiny amount of juice from about a quarter of a head of broccoli and one and a half apples !!

Have received my copy of Susannah Olivier's book and it makes very intersting reading. Quite a lot of in-depth science about all aspects of nutrition and BC, but not too preachy.

Have a healthy weekend everyone,

Anna x

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi, i was reading in one of the books that i got that japenese tea is better for fighting cancer because it is higher in EGCG. I have been looking online but its very expensive, especially if its going to be something to use on a daily basis. Lucky you have one so near though thats great.

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Re: Healthy diet

Can't believe my luck! There is a Japanese supermarket just about to open right opposite my house. Just bought a cute little teapot from the local Chinese foodstore and a bag of green tea for about £3. I love oriental food, and lots of it is cancer-fighting foods 🙂

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Re: Healthy diet

I dont think that we can avoid everything and guarantee a healthy life. I know that if we go for chicken make sure that it is corn fed or organic to avoid all the stuff they put in it to make it grow fat.

Organic fruit and veg (be careful with this as not all are what they say they are) are mostly to do with fertilisers.

I do like the sound of green tea tabs but wonder what stabilisers are used.

We cant be perfect on this but it seems we are all headed in the right direction - I have lost weight - yes although on Tamoxifen - my scar has healed very quickly compared and I feel so much better than before BC. Less stress is a big contributor for me and exercise.

Dx

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Re: Healthy diet

I worked for a Japanese company for 10 years and we always drank green tea; it was the norm to serve it to visitors and it has to be brewed very precisely. However, most of the stuff on the market here is nothing like it. They used to get staff to bring it over from Tokyo as it was so expensive in this country. When I worked in London the only place you could buy it was Fortnum and Mason's and it was £10 for a quarter pound. I've tried all sorts of green tea and green tea bags in the past couple of years, all of them have gone in the bin as I found them undrinkable. The stuff they used to get from Japan looked like dried privet hedge leaves.

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Re: Healthy diet

Hi everyone

Do any of these books mention avoiding chicken breasts? I read ages ago that they have so much oestrogen in them, that if too much is eaten, if can cause breast tissue to form in men.

As I said on my other thread, there won't be anything left for me to eat soon. I can't have lots of veg like brassicas (cabbage, etc), because I have a thyroid problem - I need lots of calcium as my mother had osteoporisis, but now some of you are saying I should avoid dairy. We are supposed to avoid too much soya. I shall be living on fruit and fish!

Ann x

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Re: Healthy diet

If anyone can't stand the taste of green tea (which I can't) quite a few health food supplement companies do Green Tea Tablets - which have all the goodness but none of the taste. I have been taking them for about a year. Healthspan (in Guernsey) do them.

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Re: Healthy diet

I agree, that David Servan-Schreiber book is amazing, I recommend it to everyone, whether they have cancer or not!

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Re: Healthy diet

Green tea is fantastic - hope you dont mind me adding as this is such an interesting read. I have been doing the carrot, avocados and blueberries and have read the anti-cancer diet by Dr David Servan-Schreiber who had cancer himself and was a scientist. He has a freebie on: http://www.penguin.co.uk/anticancer

a little booklet that you can download to glance and some interesting basic facts that we could use - eg: I never use plastic bottle water now.

As he himself says, have a look and you just take what you want from it and it can clear up some sayings and just give facts.

I dont swear by it but have found some really good info as I was changing my diet and reading different things. The last pages are really good for daily life.

Anything that helps us hey.
Best wishes. x