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Her2 Positive

queenbee1407
Member

Re: Her2 Positive

Hi Carol, sounds like you are on the same road as I.
I am 44,married with two kids.
Limbo is a great expression.
Take one day, appointment at a time.
My small lump was removed in March.
Recommended the same treatment.
I start my first course of chemotherapy tomorrow, no today, 30th April.
I have been awake most of the night feeling anxious.
This site is really useful, you can just put up your thoughts and feelings. There is always someone who will reply to your questions.
You could always pop along to a centre like maggies, where you can also get helpful information or just to relax.
I wish you the best in your treatment.
Xxx
Cassa
Member

Re: Her2 Positive

Thank you for your reply, I know you are right and I would be silly not to start treatment as soon as possible, my appointment with my oncologist is not for another 2 weeks and I think this waiting and not really knowing what's going to happen is the hardest part. I have has such support since my post this morning. Good Luck with your treatment and stay strong. X


Mrs_Moomin
Member

Re: Her2 Positive

Cassa I fully understand your sense of shock at your diagnosis. I am a bit older than you and found a lump myself but still went to the hospital in the belief that it would all turn out to be a false alarm. It wasn't and I also had a cancerous lymph node. When I emerged from the clinic, I felt as though someone had punched me in the stomach! Like you, I ad lads of sleepless nights but once the shock subsided, I knew that I would do whatever it took to get rid of the b-----. I had the op to remove the tumour and lymph nodes and was advised to have chemo (2 different courses) and radiotherapy. I am not going to pretend that I was not apprehensive about chemo but I knew that it could get rid of bad cells not detected through scans or other means. My take was and is - the sooner they are zapped the better. Please do not let your fear of side-effects of chemo put you off. Everyone reacts differently. I have felt but not been sick and the main impact has been fatigue, loss of appetite and some dizziness. However, this subsides after the first week of treatment when you are on a 3- weekly cycle. Yes, the hair goes but, between the wig and a range of scarves, I have fun giving myself a new look every day. By the way, having been told initially that I was HER2 negative, I was told that I was positive. So I will have Herceptin given to me alongside my next stage of chemo and will have tablets for 1 year but my oncologist says that it does not have side-effects. Believe me,Cassa, I am not specially brave but, hopefully, like me you will find that, once you start the treatment regime, the fear will subside because you will be too busy coping with the reality. And, if you are lucky enough to have a close and supportive family, seeing children, grandchildren and good friends can be a wonderful tonic. So I hope you may feel encouraged to go ahead with treatment sooner rather than later but it is your decision. Good luck.
Cassa
Member

Re: Her2 Positive

Hi Donna, thank you, I really appreciate your advise, feeling tons better after reading your post and after seeing my Oncologist will probably start the treatment soonest, take care and best wishes Carol x
Cassa
Member

Re: Her2 Positive

Good Morning Jane, thank you very much for your reply it has been a great help and once I have seen my oncologist I will be in touch, hugs to you
Carol x

Donnaandfamily
Member

Re: Her2 Positive

Hi Cassa

I am sorry to hear of your diagnosis.

Oncologists usually like to start chemo approx 5 weeks post surgery. I have heard that chemo usually starts within 3 months post surgery....... obviously the sooner the better

It is strange but once you start chemo treatment you are on the road to completing your journey and towards your cure. We all dread the chemo but our minds torture us ...not the chemo. It is not painful....and the worse side effect for me was the losing my hair...but I had 2 wigs which looked exactly like my hair ready for when I lost my hair (about 5 weeks after first chemo)

Side effects are well controlled...just remember make the docs aware as soon as you have a symptom...i.e heartburn...get the meds and the problem is solved immediately....the same with anything else.

Remember this is your journey and you will not have the same journey as anyone else.

If I can say anything ...it is don't be afraid.......it is not as bad as you imagine xxx All the best Donna

JaneyW
Member

Re: Her2 Positive

 

Morning Carol, and welcome to our very special club! You have just the same story as me. I was 59 when a routine mammogram picked up a tiny tumour, and I too had total clearance on surgery, with no affected nodes, and the histology showed Her2+. Like you, I was fit and well, on no treatment for any condition, so like you, it came as a bit of a shock. But from the very beginning I felt enormous grateful. Here was a tiny cancer, but it had the potential to be quite aggressive if left to its own devices. It had been completely removed, and with the chemo, radiotherapy, Herceptin and hormones the chances of it ever getting its act back together were rather dented!

 

I can't comment on the timings of your treatments. I started mine about 6 weeks after surgery, but that's a matter for you and your oncologist. But the thought of all those things is worse than the actual. Like you I have an enormously supportive family and friends. We read all we could from this site about preparing for chemo (There's a sticky thread called top tips for chemo) and just took it one day at a time. We treated the whole thing like a work project (but no spreadsheets!) and we got through.

 

I'm a year from starting chemo now, and while nobody would claim it was fun, it was entirely doable, and any side effects are very effectively dealt with by the chemo team. Radiotherapy was tiring, having to go to the hospital every weekday for 3 weeks, but again, doable. Herceptin is much easier now as they don't need to put the stuff into a drip; it goes into your thigh like an insulin injection. And the hormone tablets are boring as they remind you each morning that you're a 'patient'. Yes, they have some side effects, as does Herceptin, but I tell myself that there is a very good reason I'm taking them all, and they all have proven effects against my former squatter.

 

If you want to PM me I'm happy to tell you more, but I hope these thoughts have helped.

Gentle post-surgery hugs

Jane x

Lucy_BCC
Member

Re: Her2 Positive

Hi Cassa
Welcome to the BCC forums where you will soon have support and shared experiences to help you through this difficult time

In addition, our helpliners are on hand with further practical and emotional support on 0808 800 6000 and lines are open weekdays 9-5 and Saturday 10-2 so please feel free to call to talk things through

Here's a link to more support and Information around being diagnosed and starting treatments which may help, including BCC's 'Someone like me' service where you can speak to someone via telephone or email who has been in a similar situation to you to gain support and understand of what you are going through:

http://www.breastcancercare.org.uk/treatment

Take care
Lucy BCC

Cassa
Member

Her2 Positive

This is my first time on the forum and not sure if I am posting in the right place, on 23rd April diagnosed Her2 Positive after my tiny tumour was removed, lymph nodes were clear, have an appointment with Oncologist 15th May. My surgeon has suggested Chemotherapy, Herceptin, Radiotherapy and Hormone Therapy. I am so shocked this has all come out of the blue from a routine mammogram and I have always been very healthy, I am 58 have a very supportive husband, family and friends but so so frightened, how soon will I be starting treatment ? Can I put treatment off for a few months ? I know these are the questions I need to ask the the Oncologist but any feed back would be appreciated I feel like I am in limbo and of course not sleeping, Carol