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JaneRA's last message

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Re: JaneRA's last message

What a thoughtful and inspiring post.....just what we have all come to expect from Jane.
I will also raise a glass to you.
R.I.P

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Re: JaneRA's last message

I will raise a glass to you Jane.

Rest in Peace.

My condolences to Jane's partner.

Love Debsxxx

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Re: JaneRA's last message

Thank you Daphne and especially Jane's partner..my deepest condolences. I have been waiting for this message, I knew nothing of it's content but Jane had told me she had prepared such a message.
Jane I miss you already.
x

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JaneRA's last message

Jane's partner has asked me to post this message from Jane. Her funeral is on Monday 14th December in Winchester. If any of you would like to attend her funeral or pay your respects in some other way, please PM me and I will put you in touch with Jane's partner. She has asked me to pass on her gratitude to you all for the love and support you gave Jane.

Here is Jane's message:

As many of you know I never found anything positive or uplifting about having breast cancer....nevertheless getting breast cancer in the age of the internet has meant a support and information network which was unknown 15 years back. Thank you to everyone who has helped me on these forums since I first logged on in February 2004. Thank you for your support and information, your kindness and laughter. Thank you for great discussions and debates..

My death is but one of the 12,000 deaths from breast cancer this year. More than 45,000 women will face diagnosis in this time. My death is unremarkable. I am 60, not a bad age, even in the west, but still a premature death. Premature too are the numerous deaths from breast cancer of young women with young children. They are there, unnamed in the statistics.

I’d like to think that among those of you reading of my death today are some young women..... newly diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, the relatively unusual type I had. Today you are very frightened, crying and confused. But I want to imagine that you are going to be all right and that after your treatment is over you will decide to get involved in cancer campaigning...but not for you are the appearances in Fashion shows, not for you fundraising at pink pampering parties, not for you airbrushing the reality of this disease into some designer must have condition. You will decide on a harder more radical route...and a movement will begin to challenge governments, and research scientists, the medics and the charities. You won’t be smiling sweetly about good 5 years survival statistics...you’ll be saying that 12000 deaths a year is not good enough, that effective prevention and treatment, let alone a cure, is barely off the starting block, that this is awful and it has to change. There was the whisper of such a movement recently...I hope the movement promised comes to fruition with determined committed campaigners.

Winding forward to say 2050 and I hear you talking to your grandchildren about the old days when breast cancer still killed, and generations of women died years too soon. For now in 2050 few people get breast cancer and no one dies of it any more.

This is my hope, my hope for all your futures. Please smile and raise a glass for me in that hope. But avoid soppiness, or any references to bravery and fighting....there were none. Like the thousands before and after me, I simply did the best I could to live as well and as long as I could. We are ordinary women dealt a bad hand by breast cancer.