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Key messages about BRCA1 and BRCA2 for women with breast or ovarian cancer

Key messages about BRCA1 and BRCA2 for women with breast or ovarian cancer

Key messages about BRCA1 and BRCA2 for women with breast or ovarian cancer

 

If you have had breast or ovarian cancer and have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene fault you may be eligible to take part in this research study.

 

What is the study about?

The aim of the study is to identify the key messages required by women with breast or ovarian cancer (and their relatives) about BRCA1 and BRCA2 and the best time to receive this information.

 

Identifying the key messages about BRCA1 and BRCA2 is important for some women with breast or ovarian cancer in order to help them to reach decisions about genetic testing, managing cancer risks and informing other family members.

 

We are seeking the views of women with breast or ovarian cancer and a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene fault as well as clinicians specialising in cancer and genetics.

 

 

Who is eligible to take part in the study?

Adult women who:

  • Have had (or are currently being treated for) breast or ovarian cancer
  • Have a cancer-causing fault in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene
  • Had genetic testing in the UK after 2006
  • Were the first person in their family to be found to have the gene fault

 

What is involved in taking part in the study?

If you take part in the study we will ask you to review the information given to women with breast or ovarian cancer about a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene fault. We will ask you to decide what information you consider to be the key messages and the best time for the information to be communicated to women with cancer. We will provide you with guidelines to help you with this. We will then circulate the anonymised responses of all the participants, to see if there is agreement. We may contact you up to three times about this.  It may take you about 45 minutes to an hour the first time you review the messages and about 30 minutes after that. You would be able to do this in your own home.

 

 

What to do if you are interested in the study

This study is being undertaken by Ms Chris Jacobs, Consultant Genetic Counsellor in Cancer Genetics at Guy’s Hospital in London as part of a PhD. Chris Jacobs is funded by a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Doctoral Research Fellowship.  

 

All data will be collected and stored in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998.

 

If you are interested in finding out more about this study, please email Chris.Jacobs@gstt.nhs.uk