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Private Breast Screening

21 REPLIES 21
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Re: Private Breast Screening

Go a letter from SPSO this morning, which was pretty quick, wanted me to sign a consent form to let them look at my medical files.

Heres hoping

xx
Sharleen

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Re: Private Breast Screening

MRI costs My hubby is going for a private spinal MRI Scan Sat afternoon at Derriford Hospital, Plymouth. We have been quoted £500. Surgeon said it is cheaper to get the scan done in an NHS hospital as they share the scanner costs with the Nuffield. The Nuffield charges £600.
Hubby was waiting 5 months for an MRI scan on the NHS - took one day to arrange the private one. Just grateful we have savings for stuff like this.

If you go privately for screening, make sure they do a mammo, ultrasound and biopsy as the only way to tell conclusively if a suspicious lump/area is malignant is with a biopsy.
Good luck.
Liz.

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Re: Private Breast Screening

Screening I was diagnosed with non invasive and stage 2 invasive breast cancer in my right breast in August this year. The total tumour size was 7 cm. Fortunately there was no involvement of the lymph glands. i had a mastectomy and am currently undergoing chemo, to be followed by 3 weeks of rads and 5 years of tamoxifen. I\'m 47 and was told at my initial visit to the GP in May that the lump in my breast was probably just a cyst. consequently she did not feel it necessary to refer my to the breast clinic, probably due to the fact that I did not fall into the risk age group. I went back the following month and insisted on a referral to the breast clinic. A mammogram at the clinic showed nothing, which is apparently a common result in younger women due to the nature of breast tissue under a certain age. The tumours only showed up when an ultra sound was carried out. Before you spend a lot of money on private screening, make sure you check out what is most suitable to your age group. I know other people have said to be careful about how much and why you are spending your money on this but I can sort of understand your feelings. Because no-one can assure me that cancer cells have not spread anywhere else in my body, and because all the NHS will offer me in the future is a mammogram (like that is going to ally mye fears....not!!!) I have already started looking into MRI scanning. I have spoken to a couple of other women at the breast cancer support group who are considering the same thing. I would make sure you check out the best procedure for you. Yes it is costly but what is your life worth? The NHS has to look at cost and feasibilty because they are so overworked, so we can\'t rely on them to do what we perhaps feel that we need. Do what you feel you need to do to feel safe.

Regards
Geraldine

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Re: Private Breast Screening

Ive learnt that BUPA breast screen for £104, but would need to call them to explain why I want it done. Might give them a call.

Sharleen

P.S. Ive decided to go to the SPSO, I filed my complaint last night with them, see if they decide to accept it or not.

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Re: Private Breast Screening

Meant to also add that i think a private MRI is around £400-£500, but can\'t swear to it.

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Re: Private Breast Screening

The do warn you before rads, that there is a small chance it could CAUSE another cancer! What a choice!!

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Re: Private Breast Screening

What mystifies me is radiation causes cancer [Hiroshima, Chernobyl] and radiation kills cancer [treatment after op]. Can\'t get head round the paradox! dilly

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Re: Private Breast Screening

See they keep on using the excuse that its too much radiation, with me, and that you will end up with breast cancer, which to me is like scaremongering a little. Ive heard that this evidence is something like 21/22 years old and theres never been further study into the radiation risks.

Sharleen

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Re: Private Breast Screening

Family History hi Sharleen

I\'ve had yearly mammograms since turning 26 because of a family history of bc. i was diagnosed in august this year and as i\'m the 5th one in the family ( all maternal) its only now since my diagnosis that my sisters will be eligible for mri screening. The mri scan is apparently very expensive and my sisters will have to wait for funding before they will be screened this way!!!

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Re: Private Breast Screening

The full transcript of the hearing at Holyrood Breast Cancer (Screening) (PE904)

11:00

The Convener: Our next petition is PE904, by Katie Moffat, which calls on the Scottish Parliament to urge the Scottish Executive to consider introducing an early breast cancer screening programme in Scotland to start from age 30 upwards. I welcome to the committee Katie Moffat, who is here to make a statement in support of her petition. You have a few minutes for your opening remarks, after which we will discuss the issues that you raise.

Katie Moffat: Thank you, convener. I have submitted this petition to the Scottish Parliament on behalf of the many younger women between the ages of 30 and 50 who are developing breast cancer that is not being caught early enough, which can result in invasive surgery and sometimes death.

Breast cancer was recently thrust back into the limelight when the media reported that two prominent young women—pop singers Kylie Minogue and Anastasia—were both battling it. When I heard the news, I discussed it at length with friends and colleagues, and soon found that nearly everyone I had chatted with knew of someone who was battling, or had lost out to, breast cancer. The majority were in the 30 to 45 age bracket.

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women: nearly 30 per cent of all cancers in women occur in the breast. Each year, around 8,000 women are diagnosed before their menopause, and around 2,200 of them are in their 20s or 30s. The figures do not even include the 40s.

According to cancer statistics, the mortality rate of women over the age of 50 is declining but the incidence of breast cancer in younger women aged 30 to 50 is increasing. I would therefore like the Scottish Parliament to ask the Scottish Executive to implement an early breast cancer screening programme, replacing the current breast cancer screening programme, which starts when women are 50. If the new programme started when women were 30, it could run alongside cervical smear testing, which occurs every three years. Why not run both checks together?

The first thing that the Scottish Executive should do is to consider the cost-effectiveness of reducing the age of screening. The initial years of such a programme may be expensive, but how many young women\'s lives would be saved? How many women—whose cancer would otherwise be caught only in the latter stages when it was too late—would not leave behind children and families? How many women would not have to go

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through invasive surgery such as a mastectomy? And how many women would have a choice, rather than being told, \"Sorry, it\'s too late. You only have months to live\"?

The majority of women who have had a mastectomy or lumpectomy end up having radiotherapy or, in extreme cases, chemotherapy. Eventually, all will end up on tamoxifen, which kills any future cancerous cells before they develop. All in all, those treatments amount to a huge cost that will go on for years. Early detection would save the national health service money in the long run.

An age trial is currently being carried out by the NHS in England, looking into reducing the age of screening for breast cancer from 50 to 40. The study still has a few years left to run—it has been running for 15 years. I wonder how many women between the ages of 40 and 49 have died in the time it has taken to do the study. I hope that, when the study is published, it will become clearer just how much an early screening programme is required.

My mother had breast cancer. Contrary to popular opinion, breast cancer does not always come in the form of a lump; sometimes it is silent and deadly and there are no signs. My mother was over 50 and, just by chance, had a scan because the mobile scanner unit was in town. When the cancer was discovered, she was in the latter stages and was given approximately six weeks to live. Luckily, after a mastectomy, she lived to tell the story but, psychologically, it damaged her. How many women, who end up having invasive surgery, are psychologically damaged as a part of their body is cut off?

Early detection will reduce the death rate, reduce the effects of such loss on the families involved, and reduce the effect on the NHS and the knock-on effects on the economy in general. More often than not, early detection results in successful treatment. Scotland should strive to address the issues of preventive medicine—especially where early detection is proven to save lives and to improve the quality of life—and should strive to set a standard for the rest of the United Kingdom.

I have received approximately 100 e-mails in support of this petition. They are still coming in every day, from people I know and from people I do not know. All those people have stories to tell—some with hope and some with sadness. I will leave a copy of them all for members to read.

From the e-mails, there is one particular story that I would like to relate before I finish. I received it from a friend of mine. She says:

\"I currently have three friends who have had or are fighting breast cancer aged 32, 35 and 42.

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The 42-year-old is now terminally ill and is leaving 3 young children and a very loving husband behind as it was caught too late. A five minute screening would have prevented this.

The 32-year-old has had to have a double mastectomy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She is awaiting reconstructive surgery.

The 35-year-old had a lumpectomy, glands removed, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and a 5 year course of Tamoxifen. These friends were lucky—the lump was found and dealt with quickly.\"

As teenagers, we all spoke with our friends and wondered what we would be doing by the time we reached 40. None of us replied, \"Dying with breast cancer.\"

Thank you for your time.

The Convener: Thank you very much for lodging what is obviously a difficult petition for you to discuss. Do members have questions?

John Scott: You gave some figures, which I did not hear exactly, about those who are affected between 20 and 30 years old, 30 and 40 years old and 40 and 50 years old. Perhaps you could give us the figures again.

Katie Moffat: Yes. I got the figures from the Breakthrough Breast Cancer website. Around 8,000 women are diagnosed before the menopause. A lot of women aged over 50 are diagnosed at the time of or after the menopause. About 8,000 younger women in their 20s, 30s and 40s, who normally would not be going through the menopause at that time, are diagnosed. About 2,200 women in their 20s and 30s are diagnosed per year. That does not include the 40s age bracket. The figure is probably higher.

John Scott: Do you have the figures for women aged 30 to 40 and 40 to 50?

Katie Moffat: No. I just have what I could get. Some of the statistics are from last year or the year before. Obviously, the statistics for 2005 will not be published until the end of 2005. The figures are changing.

John Scott: Is the figure that you gave a Scottish figure?

Katie Moffat: I think it is a UK figure.

John Scott: What was the name of the website? I am sorry, but I did not hear it.

Katie Moffat: I have quite a few statistics from different websites, which I have printed off. One was the Breakthrough Breast Cancer website and I also got figures from the NHS breast screen programme website.

John Scott: You make a good case. Thank you for bringing the petition here today.

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Helen Eadie: Good morning, Katie. The petition is important. I lost a dear friend, who was aged under 50, to breast cancer, so I support your petition.

One of the issues on which I want you to comment is the efficacy of the screening programme. There are doubting Thomases who do not believe that the programme is having the impact that they would like it to have, which I think is one of the reasons why the Government has not launched a wider screening programme. Would you like to say more about the information that you have gathered that relates to the efficacy of screening programmes?

Katie Moffat: Women can have cervical smear tests every three years. Cervical cancer is a slow-progressing cancer; it is not an aggressive cancer so it could take a couple of years to develop. Breast cancer develops at an alarming, aggressive rate. The type of cancer that my mum had was unusual and fast progressing. All cancers are different and develop at different speeds. The majority of breast cancers can kill within six to eight months—within a year anyway.

It surprises me that cervical cancer, which is slower to develop, gets quite a lot of attention, with three-yearly screening, whereas breast cancer does not. It gets attention in relation to women aged over 50, which is fine, but a lot of women to whom I have spoken were not invited for screening until they were 53. Things are not working at that end of the scale either.

Things seem to be different in every health district; they all seem to run things differently. Women should be invited for screening at aged 50 and that should be it, but that is not happening.

I received more than 100 e-mails from all different age groups, all of which reported different things. A lot of women who are going for screening at age 50, 51, or 52—depending on when they are invited—are finding out then that they have cancer. It does not always come in the form of a lump. Sometimes it is silent and deadly; women just do not know that they have it. Although women are told how to check themselves, many women still do not know how to do so and, perhaps because they lead hectic lives, do not even think about breast cancer. I know that I do not think about it.

Given the incidence of breast cancer among the people from all over Scotland who have spoken to me—I have had e-mails even from people who work in the Western general, which specialises in breast cancer—the incidence of breast cancer among younger women seems to be increasing. The statistics also show an increase. The mortality rate at the other end of the scale is dropping—which is fair enough—but I do not know what the

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mortality rate is among younger women who have breast cancer. However, the incidence of breast cancer in younger women is increasing and, over the next five years, may increase even more. The age study that I mentioned—it should be due for publication next year or the year after—will probably reflect that increase, as the study has been on-going for 15 years since it was commissioned in 1991.

Helen Eadie: Is that study being done by the University of Surrey?

Katie Moffat: I think so, yes. The study is being done for the NHS down south. It has been running for quite a while, but how many women in the younger age groups have died during that time? Perhaps breast cancer is becoming more prevalent because of environmental changes. Also, women\'s bodies have changed quite a bit over the past 15 years. When I was a kid, I hardly ever heard of anyone suffering from breast cancer but the disease seems to have become more and more common. That is a problem that needs to be looked at.

The Convener: I bring some personal experience of the issue, but I have a question for Katie Moffat. My father-in-law died of breast cancer—only 200 men a year fall victim to that type of cancer—but he was told by the specialist that his daughters would have a greater propensity towards breast cancer. He was very much aware of that, so he encouraged my wife and her sister to learn how to check for the signs of breast cancer.

When my wife started to see things changing, she asked her general practitioner whether the signs indicated anything. However, the GP told her that she was too young to have breast cancer so she need not worry because it could not happen. My wife was a bit more persistent than that, so she continually went back to the GP to point out the changes that were taking place that she was concerned about. To put her mind at rest, the GP sent my wife to a consultant, who carried out a scan that proved to be inconclusive. However, the consultant was not happy with the scan, so he carried out a biopsy. Only the biopsy proved that my wife had cancer.

My wife was 33 and she had all the outward signs of breast cancer, but the problem is that the existence of the cancer was proved only by the biopsy, not by a scan. I have heard specialists say repeatedly that the problem is that the breast tissue of a 30-year-old does not allow the scan to show conclusively whether there is breast cancer. That is the reason that the medical profession resists widespread screening for such age groups.

However, my concern is that the GP ruled out the possibility that my wife might have cancer because she was so young. Is not the problem

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that people do not get the support that they need from their GP? No matter how much support people get from the people who carry out the scan, a scan may not show whether cancer is present if the woman is aged 30, 31 or 32.

Katie Moffat: Quite a few websites suggest that, because of the density of the breast tissue, screening can be done only on those who are agued 50 or upwards. However, for younger age groups, ultrasound scanning would probably show up things. Now that the genes that cause breast cancer have been isolated, it is possible to have a blood test, from which the blood sample is taken back to the lab for a couple of months where any changes in the cells can be watched. That means that people can be more proactive. I get such a blood test every year.

Sorry, I have lost what the question was.

11:15

The Convener: My question was about the ability of GPs to identify breast cancer in younger women.

Katie Moffat: I suppose that it depends on the training that GPs receive, but some GPs seem very rushed. For example, when I try to get an appointment for my daughter, I need to book the appointment about a month in advance. Perhaps because GPs are really busy, they do not have time to push the issue. In my mum\'s case, her GP totally missed the fact that she had breast cancer. Although she did not have a lump she had a different sign that appeared, but the GP simply dispensed some tablets and told her \"Away you go.\" Perhaps GPs need more rigorous training on what to look for. Even the leaflets that tell a woman how to check herself do not seem to be widely available. It seems to be a hit or a miss because they are available in some areas but not in others.

The Convener: That is what my question was getting at. Even when a doctor suspects that cancer might be present, the test cannot always prove it. Therefore, the most important thing is that women have information so that they know what to look for. Secondly, GPs need to recognise that women of the age that we are discussing can get breast cancer, so the possibility should not be dismissed. I learned something from the experience that I encountered. Once my wife had seen the consultant, the problem started to be dealt with, but the information and what happened at the GP level were a bit more problematic.

Katie Moffat: We definitely need more information and publicity on what people should look for. For example, perhaps a little leaflet could be given out at every doctor\'s surgery. I have never seen anything like that being offered to

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younger women at my doctor\'s surgery. That might already happen in some health board areas, but it does not happen in many. At the moment, people receive information only if they are attending the hospital for a check-up either personally or with someone else. People should not have to ask for the information. Every woman in the country should automatically get a leaflet that tells them how to check for breast cancer. A lot of women simply do not know how to do that.

John Scott: Should different types of mass screening techniques be developed for the under-50s? I would not begin to know what those techniques might be, but we could discuss that issue in writing with people.

Katie Moffat: Yes. In this day and age of technology, it must surely be possible to do something. Mammograms are suitable only for people who are over 50, but ultrasound seems to be becoming quite big. I know that it is now possible for pregnant women to get a three-dimensional-effect colour picture of their baby before it is even born. If it is possible to do that, surely it should be possible to come up with what we are looking for. It need not be a big X-ray machine thing.

John Scott: That technology is relatively cheap, too.

Katie Moffat: There should be something out there that can do that. Perhaps other countries already have something.

The Convener: I thank Katie Moffat for bringing her petition to the committee. How do members want to take the petition forward?

Helen Eadie: Perhaps we should write to the Scottish Executive\'s breast and cervical screening national advisory group, the United Kingdom screening committee, the Institute for Cancer Research, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Cancer Research UK and the Minister for Health and Community Care. We should also write to the cross-party group on cancer—of which I am a member—as I know that the cross-party group is interested in the issue.

Ms White: I agree with Helen Eadie. It might also be worth our while asking about the study that is being done by the University of Surrey. I assume that the study has been done on a UK basis—given that it has been on-going for 15 years—rather than on just a London basis.

In our correspondence, we should also mention the fact—which I think John Scott highlighted—that many women do not want to undergo a mammogram because it is uncomfortable. Surely there must be some other kind of scan.

The Convener: Shall we ask whether there are alternatives to the mammogram?

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Ms White: Yes. That is a big thing for many women who will not undergo a mammogram.

John Scott: We can ask about what is most appropriate for different age groups of women.

The Convener: We will write to all the various organisations. We will get back to you, Ms Moffat, and let you know what they tell us. We will then discuss the matter further. Thank you very much for bringing us your petition this morning.

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Re: Private Breast Screening

supermum I think is the second matter of the day

You will see the meeting convened at 10.02am well the woman who put forward the case Katie Moffat was heard at 11.00am

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Re: Private Breast Screening

hi sharleen

am curios now

found the scottish parliament website - searched public petitions committees and .... thats where i get lost

my eyes hurt too

please help

adele xxx

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Re: Private Breast Screening

Marsrden is quite far away, Ilive in the west of scotland. Its not that Im totally panicking about it all, I dont spend my days worrying about it, though I am very very concerned at their risk assessment. Im more angry in general at the way ive been treated by gp and genetics team. I could go to SPSO, but I just wonder if it will be worth my while.

Molly, I am amazed at their assessment given lack of family history, their reason, \"you two aunts havent had it\", I didnt know that bc picks and chooses its targets personally. Ive decided to start this earlier coz we really just dont know if this runs in te family or not and thats quite scary, if they even offered to gene test, but hey wont even do that. They just wont meet me half way on this.

Quote of letter I was sent :

\"If you are concerned about this matter, you can actaully ask for a private mammogram, this is something that your GP can help you with, please be careful of the acumulative radiation doses\"

Would privavte hospitals not use ultra sound??

I really just wanted some info on private screening for myself, I was gonna go for screening every two years or so, just to look after myself, coz lets face it the NHS wont look after me.

love

Sharleen

P.S. Have a look at this webpage, around halfway down (11.00am meeting), its the Public Petitions Commitee at the Scottish Parliment, a woman appeared infront of it wanting the age of mammography lowered to 30 years. I dont know what the outcome of this was, if there has been one.

http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/business/committees/petitions/or-05/pu05-1902.htm

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Re: Private Breast Screening

Hi Sharleen I\'m sorry to hear you\'re still having no joy with genetics or GP, that is so stressful.

I am just wondering why you are thinking of being screened now, as opposed to five years prior to your mum\'s diagnosis age?
The genetics clinic would usually start the screening five years before the youngest relative is diagnosed, although that might vary, I have heard that somewhere its 10 years. You might find that more cost effective as well. I know they can not get an accurate family history in your case because of the adoption angle, and I\'m still amazed they\'re not erring on the side of caution with you, given the lack of family history info.
In my case I start screening five years before my youngest relative was diagnosed so I\'ll be 35, my aunt was diagnosed at 40.

take care
Justine
x

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Re: Private Breast Screening

hi sharleen famly history is a difficult one

i have had BC twice - after my 1st time i was told that BC was on my mums side of the family; however, my mum and my nana never contracted the disease ! it was only my nans sisters (some) and their daughters (not all) who were diagnosed.

i attended a genetics clinic in M/cr and my doc felt there \'could be a family history but its not a strong one\'. only if it affects each generation is it classed as dire need for screening.

i assume the digital screening that Liz is on about could be the \'Thermoscans\' - forgive me if im wrong - but my genetics doc did tell me (i asked him what his opinions on it where) yes, cancer can be found on these scans but usually and MRI scan needs to follow to detect exactly where the \'cells\' would be situated.

however, i have a contact on Breakthrough who swears by the Thermoscan.

i am so sorry that you are in a no win situ with your GP - shoot him i say! - and his lack of respect for your feelings. have you tried talking to a Breast Care Nurse - tho i feel you may come up against the same answers there too.

shop around for MRI scans - they tend to differ in costs pending on the \'postcode\'. one of my BCN\'s did the same thing, she needed an MRI for sumat and ended up miles away from Wigan. Yorkshire way i think - so it just shows you.

good luck in your quest n keep up posted

loadsa luv adele xxxxxxxxxxxxx

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Re: Private Breast Screening

Sharleen I think it\'s the Royal Marsden which was in the news 2004 for digital screening. This has far more accurate results and picks up early br ca better.If you\'re in a dreadful state could you talk to your GP about referral? Wouldn\'t worry too much about post test expenses if anything nasty is found because early 2004 was looking for lumpectomy for daughter privately due to NHS surgeons all being on Xmas ski hols so ops delayed. Phoned Marsden and was told that if I paid for private consultation the op could be done NHS. Ended up by paying for good local surgeon to do op as waiting time was the same and daughter didn\'t want to be far from home.
As for prev post no genetic factors sounds like money down the drain. Ask yourself if you\'ve got normal female hysteria or powerful feminine intuition. Phone Marsden for prices and see how that stacks up versus your feelings! Best wishes, dilly

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Re: Private Breast Screening

private breast screening costs Hi Sharleen,

I have no idea what private bc screening costs, as I was treated throughout by the NHS, which was fantastic.Once you are diagnosed you are on a roller coaster of tests, surgeries, chemo and radiotherapy.

However, my 78 yr old husband is currently going through tests to find out his problems in walking - 6 yrs of not being able to walk 50 yds,.This year on the NHS, now his feet are numb, he has been seen by a vascular surgeon, a cardiologist and had an angiogram,and no further forward so we decided to go privately. Last week, a half hour consultation with a spinal neurosurgeon cost £180, and this week another MRI (first one done on the NHS after 5 months wait) is going to cost £500. We don\'t know what the ultimate costs will be, but have no children, and are prepared to spend our savings to give him a better quality of life.

We are retired and luckily have savings, but if you don\'t have a serious problem that the NHS will immediately take over, you are into big bucks. I can\'t see that your GP will refer you to a bc clinic if you have no symptoms. I didn\'t even have any! Just had my 3 yrly mammos and they found a large invasive tumour that neither my Gp nor I could feel. I would seriously think about your motives before you get into the private sector and spend a lot of money that may not be warranted.

Hope you get your problems/fears sorted out.
Love. Liz

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Re: Private Breast Screening

supermum Either mammo or ultrasound. Ive done that much arguing with genetics. I ended up getting a letter telling me to go private, at the time I was realy angry about that, but i at the stage I just cant be bothered with these people anymore. So thats why Im trying to find out about it privately. My GP has been hopeless throughout this sorry mess, he seemed to \'side\' with genetics, and I just felt so alone, I felt like I had been stabbed in the back, I dont trust him no more (I really should change GP), so thats why I want to do some research myself so that Im armed with information.

I enquired about this MRI scan research at the time of my NHS complaint and I was told that it was only being offered to women in the highest risk category only(I live in Scotland, NICE doesnt have any juristriction here) I dont even think its happening here yet.

Sharleen

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Re: Private Breast Screening

Hello, Sharleen - Looking at your posting, I wondered why you feel so strongly that you need to be screened? Your mother had bc, but neither of her sisters, and from what you indicate neither grandmother. Has something happened that makes you think you are at risk?

BCC say in their piece about screening: \" Women with a strong family history of breast cancer may have an increased risk. A small number of women are at especially high risk because of faulty genes they have inherited. However, faults in known high-risk breast cancer genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for fewer than 10% of breast cancer cases. But most women with one or two affected relatives will never develop breast cancer. \"

I think the two important statements here are (1) a strong family history of breast cancer and (2) most women with one or two affected relatives will never develop breast cancer.

It\'s your money, but I really do wonder if it will be well spent. You will have to contact the private hospitals and ask if they will do this screening. Is there a Maggie Centre within reach? If so, you might go and talk to them.

Good luck, whatever.

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Re: Private Breast Screening

hi sharleen

when u say screened, do u mean go for mammograms? if so, you may find that u may be turned away, or if u are given one, they may be nothing to find.

why? well, it is true that - as young ones - it is difficult to find anything on a mammo as our breast tissue is quite dense.

on each occasion of my finding lumps on both breasts on each mammo, nothing could be found,it was only after having an ultrasound that they were spotted - many on here will probably have the same experience

HOWEVER. after speaking to my doc at the Genetics in Manchester, he told me that it has been discovered / decided that the MRI scans are able to detect any signs of cancer. apparently NICE have some info somewhere (and my genetics doc was involved in that project)

it might be worth looking into, but MRI scans do cost as there are so few of them around the country; some hopsitals have to resort to mobile ones.

good luck with your quest and i sincerely hope things work out well for you

take care n loadsa luv adele xxxxxxxxxxx

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Re: Private Breast Screening

Private Breast Screening After much thought, I have decided, reluctantly, to go private. What I am wondering is will a private hospital screen me at 26? and what am I looking at roughly cost wise ? Would like to hear your experiences.

Just for anyone who hasnt read any of my posts before, a quick resume, mother was 48 at diagnosis, not sure of family history, granmother adopted at birth, genetic deptartment not interested in the least bit, saying theres no risk cause my mums two sisters aint had it, been down nhs complaints, could go to SPSO, from what Ive heard about then, probably a waste of time

Love

xx
Sharleen

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Private Breast Screening

Private Breast Screening