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Restless legs

3 REPLIES 3
Caroline60
Member

Re: Restless legs

Hi Sooty, restless legs are soooo normal when you are going through treatment. I got my OH to massage my feet before I went to be. This worked. 

poemsgalore
Member

Re: Restless legs

Hi, I used to have RLS, not related to cancer or chemo. There are thoughts that a lack of iron can be the cause of it. I know I used to be very anaemic, but that has changed and my iron count is good. I no longer have restless legs. I realise this might not be the cause of yours. but perhaps you should have your iron levels checked just in case, and if it proves that your levels are low, a course of either folic acid or ferrous sulphate might just do the trick. 

 

However, I found this on

 

 http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/restless_legs/detail_restless_legs.htm 

 

which not only mentions lack of iron, but also mentions our old friend metoclopramide, one of the commonest anti-sickness meds for chemo patients.

 

"In most cases, the cause of RLS is unknown. However, it may have a genetic component; RLS is often found in families where the onset of symptoms is before age 40. Specific gene variants have been associated with RLS. Evidence indicates that low levels of iron in the brain also may be responsible for RLS.

Considerable evidence suggests that RLS is related to a dysfunction in the brain’s basal ganglia circuits that use the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is needed to produce smooth, purposeful muscle activity and movement. Disruption of these pathways frequently results in involuntary movements. Individuals with Parkinson’s disease, another disorder of the basal ganglia’s dopamine pathways, often have RLS as well.

RLS also appears to be related to the following factors or conditions, although researchers do not yet know if these factors actually cause RLS:

  • Chronic diseases such as kidney failure, diabetes, and peripheral neuropathy. Treating the underlying condition often provides relief from RLS symptoms.
  • Certain medications that may aggravate symptoms. These medications include antinausea drugs (prochlorperazine or metoclopramideC), antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol or phenothiazine derivatives), antidepressants that increase serotonin, and some cold and allergy medications-that contain sedating antihistamines.
  • Pregnancy, especially in the last trimester. In most cases, symptoms usually disappear within 4 weeks after delivery.

Alcohol and sleep deprivation also may aggravate or trigger symptoms in some individuals. Reducing or completely eliminating these factors may relieve symptoms, but it is unclear if this can prevent RLS symptoms from occurring at all."

 

Hope this helps. xx

Jo_BCC
Member

Re: Restless legs

Hi Sooty36

 

Sorry you haven't had any replies to your question as yet, but hopefully someone will now see it.  Our helpline team are just a free phone call away if you would like to chat to someone about restless legs.  0808 800 6000 lines open weekdays 9-5 and Saturdays 10-2.

 

Take care,

Jo, Moderator

Sooty36
Member

Restless legs

Had 10 sessions of chemo, 2 to go and have developed restless legs! Driving me mad! Anybody else had this and what helps??? X