72.8K members
1.2M posts
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Big shock

6 REPLIES 6
Dogwalker
Member

Re: Big shock

I think it's the word "cancer" that strikes fear. I am usually optimistic and do not panic easily, but when I was given my diagnosis I imagined the worst. Two years ago I donated a kidney to my husband and then the prospect of surgery was not at all daunting, but I felt nervous prior to my lumpectomy. However, all went well, with clear margins and now it's just a matter of 15 sessions of radiotherapy and taking tablets. Looking back I don't know why I was so affected by the diagnosis. It sounds an odd thing to say, but I think I was a bit too overwhelmed with support. At every stage I was contacted by a breast care nurse asking how I felt and checking what concerns I had. It was all wonderful service, but it made me think that there must be cause to worry.

We always hear in the news about people dying after "a battle with cancer", so it's not surprising that being diagnosed causes shock and panic. Whilst not denying that it can result in devastating consequences for some people, there must be a way to lessen the worry for those who can be treated successfully.

 

Teya
Member

Re: Big shock

Some good news today!

Tumor is grade 1 ( slow growing) and no sign of anything suspicious in lymph nodes!!

Appointment on Tuesday to discuss treatment plan but feeling very relieved and positive!!

My son is getting married on 21st and I was dreading having to putting on a “brave” face, but in the words of the nurse who gave me the result: best news we could have hoped for: go and celebrate!!

 

i know there is still the lumpectomy and radio therapy to come and possible hormone treatment afterwards but for now I feel grateful......💕💕

Teya
Member

Re: Big shock

Thank you Kip. I suppose we all think it won’t happen to us.... until it does! 

Teya
Member

Re: Big shock

Thank You! 

It helps just putting it down into words 💕

ann-m
Community Champion

Re: Big shock

Hi Teya,

First of all welcome, even if it's not where you want to be, as it is for all of us.

Yes, it is a shock, I remember it well!  My bc was picked up on second screening too, but now 3 years down the line, I'm so relieved it was, as it was early, treatment was completed within 4 months & then back to life as usual.

The early days of diagnosis are a rollercoaster, there is a succession of appointments, but it does all settle down when the treatment plan is confirmed.

Although it doesn't feel like it, thankfully screening has done it's job & it will now be dealt with.

There's loads of support here, so do come & chat or vent whenever you need to.

ann x

 

 

Kip
Community Champion
Community Champion

Re: Big shock

Hello Teya,  a big shock indeed.  I can imagine you feel rocked to the core at the moment but try to take it one step at a time.  It's awful when you get the diagnosis and then have to wait for further results before anything can happen but they need to get a full picture before they can give you a treatment plan.  Don't be alarmed if you have to have further scans/mri it's commonplace to have them at the beginning and you can wait a while for results too.  I'm glad you came on here, let us know how you are doing, you are not alone.. We've all had our worlds turned upside down too.

Kip

Teya
Member

Big shock

So I attended a mammogram two weeks ago today as part of National Screening programme. I am 53 and this was my 2nd time. No family history of any cancer, don't smoke, drink sensibly, keep fit and make sure I eat well. Came home on Tuesday night to a letter asking me to attend breast clinic today. " only 4 out of a hundred woman" will be invited for further tests. "This does not mean you have cancer" only 1 in 4 woman attending clinic will have cancer. 

I didn't like those odds.

I was right. Consultant graded the ultra sound U5. Cancer. She rated the mammogram M5. Cancer.

 

technically we are awaiting the results of today's biopsies, but the consultant has told me I will have surgery, followed by radiotherapy and further treatment based on the results.

two days ago all was well in my world, today I have breast cancer.