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Spread of cancer due to surgery?

2 REPLIES 2
rose_wilts
Member

Re: Spread of cancer due to surgery?

Thank you so much, Citty, for your very sensible comments on the article - that's really helpful. I find it particularly easy to put the fear of god into myself in the run-up to a full moon! Smiley LOL

Citty
Member

Re: Spread of cancer due to surgery?

This is what I think. The particular study mentioned in the link was conducted on mice so may not be able to be extrapolated to humans (I am able to access the full paper). It doesn't conclude that surgery will/does cause spread, only that the researchers might have found a mechanism by which cancer cells that have already spread might become active.  It does say "The new research contradicts the idea that surgeons might be releasing cancerous cells that then travel to other parts of the body." and "there is so much tissue removed surrounding the tumor that it isn’t really feasible for the operation to be spreading cancerous cells."  The comment in the article that it's not the tumour in the breast that kills you, it's the distant spread is true. Untreated breast cancer will spread locally and to other parts of the body. There will always be examples of people who say they've been cured without conventional treatment, but there are also a heck of a lot more folk out there who have been cured conventionally!  Good luck with your treatment rose_wilts.

rose_wilts
Member

Spread of cancer due to surgery?

I was recently diagnosed with cancer and am going to be having a double mastectomy next month. I was just wondering whether anyone had an information about some research that was publicised this April, which seems to indicate a link between having surgery and getting metastases - see, for example, http://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2018/04/11/breast-cancer-surgery-spread. To quote:

 

“The post-surgical wound-healing response somehow releases already disseminated cells, cells that have already spread to distant sites in the body, releasing them from the constraints that have previously prevented them from growing actively,” says professor Robert Weinberg, the new study’s senior author.

 

If anyone has any thoughts about/update on this, I'd be very interested to know.