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Chemo help

10 REPLIES 10
annatommo
Member

Re: Chemo help

Hi Marie,

I think the trouble with reading stuff is that they have to give you the worse case information too & that’s why I wanted to do my post to say that it can be nothing like as bad as that! I had a picc line which I was nervous about bout it really was comfortable & didn’t stop me moving around as normal. Was so much easier especially when I was watching people who were struggling to be canulated. I am still painting my eyebrows on ( bit of a pain 😂) but I think I’m quite good at it now. Even tried magnetic eyelashes if I was going somewhere nice & they worked really well too. I really hope all goes well for you. I’m 4/5 weeks post chemo & feel amazing so there is an end in sight. Wishing you all the best x

MarieColette1
Member

Re: Chemo help

Hi Anna,

Just wanted to thank you for posting your positive message. I have just received my dates for my chemo treatments and thought I'd better find out about it but the more I read about it the more I get scared. It's like having a baby, sometimes you wonder if it's not better not to know in advance as it could make you anxious. Anyway I will try the fasting, my cousin did it as well and so far it worked well for her too. I will also try to keep the exercise going, maybe the running if I can with a PICC not sure it's practical/feasible? I don't really mind about hair loss, eyebrow loss might be more depressing so intend to draw them, while trying not to look like a clown 🙂

Thank you again,

Marie

christie james
Member

Re: Chemo help

But i have listened that steriods are a little effective to your health.

Is it true ?

Thanks in advance!

bookish
Member

Re: Chemo help

@claud272 Apparently I was meant to start last week, but as no one bothered to tell me (seriously!) it didn't happen! I've got port fitting surgery on Friday coming, but no new start date for treatment as they're "extremely busy" - no, no, not going crazy with the waiting and the unknown o.O

Absolutely agree on the healthier eating. I had chemo before many years ago and bloated up *so* badly, I'm determined not to let that happen again. Plus just any boost to my overall wellbeing I can get: the words "I may give up sugar" have crossed my lips - I have a reasonably healthy diet, I think, apart from a very sweet tooth. Think it might be worth it, but my contact at Maggies did suggest during chemo wasn't really the time for things like that.

Thinking of you too - we'll get through this, and always happy for a chat if you need to reach out xx

claud272
Member

Re: Chemo help

@bookish

Hi thanks for your input. Have you got a date to start? Will be thinking of you and sending you all the love and hugs for when you start!

Maybe as a good compromise just eat little less and also healthily, these days I find I cannot eat loads anymore like when younger (maybe it's just body telling me!) Many ladies also say listen to your body and I have totally cut out coffee which I use to have sugar in! Don't miss it either. Am quite proud because I never thought I could quite coffee!

Anyway....you are right...you don't want to start on the wrong foot to be ill and that adds to already a daunting process. 

Keep going, we can keep spurring each other on  let us know how you get on with chemo. I just want mine now...I am so frightened of so many things ie what will come out of scans or if it spreads etc. So hard but I try to keep positive!!!!

C x

annatommo
Member

Re: Chemo help

Thanks. My weight actually stayed the same. I think the steroids I was given as part of my treatment probably helped with that!

All the best to you too.

Jaybro
Member

Re: Chemo help

Hi Anna

That’s excellent news that you have come through relatively unscathed. I can understand fasting may help some people. (I’m currently on oral chemo and must take the tablets with food so no good to me). How does it affect weight? I went down to 6 st 4 lb without fasting and the result was irreparable damage to my tendons. Frustrating. 

I totally agree with your comments about humour. My whole blog is based on trying to find the funny side, I even won a flash fiction competition with my account of the unexpected aspects of treatment, peeing in every direction etc. What I wanted to say is that I know some people attribute their success to a positive mindset, something we would all aspire to, but, as with the ‘fight the cancer battle’ analogy, if some people have a rough time, this language can make them feel they are failing in some way when it’s nothing to do with that. We are emotionally very vulnerable at all stages and looking for the positive is important but not always achievable. The alternative is not negative. Acceptance? It may just be gritting one’s teeth and getting through as best we can. 

I hope your treatment has been successful. Stay vigilant not just with your breasts but with your whole body. It’s common sense rather that gloom-mongering. 

All the best 

annatommo
Member

Re: Chemo help

Hi researchers believe that fasting may make cancer cells more responsive to chemotherapy whilst protecting other cells. Fasting may also boost the immune system to help fight cancer that is already present. I have also read that longer fasting periods can also reduce the risk of recurrence. I can’t obviously comment on whether you should  do it or not but I personally found it very easy to do & yes I drank lots of water, black tea/coffee and didn’t really feel hungry or tired  or anything. May be worth doing some of your own research. Michael Mosley or Tiffany Youngs & Dr Mindy Pelz to name but a few. Hope this helps. 

bookish
Member

Re: Chemo help

@claud272 I'm due to start chemo next week (I think - it's been a bit of a scheduling mess!) and looked into the fasting idea. There's no official recommendation for it as far as I'm aware. I believe the principle is that it puts the healthy cells into a more dormant state, so they are less likely to 'take in' the chemotherapy drugs and thus may minimise some side effects of treatment. Meanwhile the cancer cells are unaffected by the fasting.

Like you, I don't do well skipping meals at all. Having looked into it a bit, I decided not to bother. It's not official advice, and I don't think making myself feel ill before I start the chemo is going to be good for me, for possible anecdotal benefits.

Obviously it's for you to decide what's best for you, but your medical team will have the best advice for you personally. Best of luck with treatment xx

claud272
Member

Re: Chemo help

May I ask why fasting will help? I need to know the logic behind it I guess. When I don't eat my energy levels drop really badly as I have low blood pressure (could faint!) ...did you just drink water then? I heard plenty of water intake. 

C x

 

annatommo
Member

Chemo help

Hi After just finishing 21 weeks of chemo, Ec then Paclitaxel I just wanted to share my experience. Positive mindset - it really isn’t as frightening as you imagine and the nurses definitely help with that. Keep active as much as you can - I managed to keep doing daily walks & weekly runs throughout. I was fairly fit before but whatever your level of fitness just getting outside into the fresh air & moving can help so much mentally & physically. I fasted for 40 hours before my chemo as I had read that this can be beneficial. It may not be for everyone but I can only tell you my experience which was very few & very mild side effects. I didn’t have to use any of the medication I was given & had very little fatigue and in fact really carried on pretty much as normal.

Yes I lost my hair but a sense of humour helped with that & we as a family & with friends too tried to not take things too seriously & laugh as much as you can!

I know some people’s chemo journey is very different but mine was nothing like as bad as I expected.

Anna